Search Project Mgmt
Search FileMaker Blogs

Thank you for visiting the FileMaker Thoughts blog. I recently moved this content over from my blogger account. Hope you like it! When you get a chance, check out the centralized search feature for all the FileMaker blogs found along the right side panel. It is quite handy!


Wednesday
Aug012007

Get(PrivilegeSetName) Returns “Full Access”

From Dwayne Wright - www.dwaynewright.com

Get(PrivilegeSetName) Returns “Full Access” When That Isn’t The Case

Professional FileMaker developers tend to use FileMaker Advanced for database design exclusively. Yesterday, I was working on three different projects throughout the day. One of the clients are still on FileMaker 8, one where the clients are on FileMaker 8.5 and an internal project that I’m using FileMaker 9 to design with. In all situations, I’m using the FileMaker Advanced version because of schema copying, the script debugger and the data viewer.

FYI... I’m a seriously trying not to hate the FileMaker 9 changes in ScriptMaker, the Data Viewer and the Script Debugger. So far, it’s a losing battle as I mentally drink my cup of HaterAid and repeat the mantra “I just got to get used to it is all”.

Anyway, I mentioned FileMaker Advanced earlier in case you are using regular FileMaker and couldn’t find your Data Viewer. It is a FileMaker Advanced only feature. Now back to the original story.

I noticed that the Data Viewer was returning “Full Access” when I was reviewing the Get(PrivilegeSetName) function. However, I was logged in as a lower level account to test a fulfillment script. I was having a problem with the script and thought it might had been related to the security setting access my clients would be using.

Of course, I began jumping to the conclusion that this was a FileMaker 9 bug. That is until I realized that I was working with FileMaker 8.5. That can happen in the heat of battle and running multiple copies of FileMaker at the same time.

Then I remembered that in my first try and troubleshooting the script, I had turned on the option to run the script in Full Access mode! So naturally, the data viewer would return “Full Access” while running the script. That setting trumps the users account setting during the execution of the script!

Here is that pesky little setting that was confusing me. This is a wonderful addition to ScriptMaker by the way. My example above is just an illustration on how you can get confused when you are using such a feature rich application!

=
More info about the author and FileMaker in general, contact me at info@dwaynewright.com.

© 2007 - Dwayne Wright - dwaynewright.com

The material on this document is offered AS IS. There is NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY, expressed or implied, nor does any other contributor to this document. WARRANTIES OF MERCHANT ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMED. Consequential and incidental damages are expressly excluded. FileMaker Pro is the registered trademark of FileMaker Inc.

Tuesday
Jul312007

Opening Remote FileMaker Files

From Dwayne Wright - www.dwaynewright.com

FileMaker databases worked upon locally (on the hard drive of your computer) opens up pretty much the same as any computer application. Traditionally, two swift clicks of the mouse (called a double click) launches FileMaker and opens the file.

You can do the same thing if the file is located on a file server or on another persons hosted machine. However, although you can do this, FileMaker strongly recommends it. As a professional database developer, I double strongly recommend against it! It may not happen today, tomorrow or the day after but some day this method of opening remote files will crash the database and damage it.

So what is the recommended way to open a FileMaker database that is not on your individual computer? First, any files on a file server should be there for backup reasons only. FileMaker files should never be launched from a file server. FileMaker files should be opened on a regular users machine and then connected to by using the Open Remote option. Then you can navigate to the file to open and open it there.

Yet a better way is to use FileMaker Server!

If you purchase the FileMaker Server product and have a dedicated machine to run it, you will be operating your FileMaker solution in a safer environment, have a noticeable speed increase, be able to make scheduled backups and much more! Be sure to check out FileMaker’s web site (www.filemaker.com) for more information on the FileMaker Server product.
=
More info about the author and FileMaker in general, contact me at info@dwaynewright.com.

© 2007 - Dwayne Wright - dwaynewright.com

The material on this document is offered AS IS. There is NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY, expressed or implied, nor does any other contributor to this document. WARRANTIES OF MERCHANT ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMED. Consequential and incidental damages are expressly excluded. FileMaker Pro is the registered trademark of FileMaker Inc.

Sunday
Jul292007

Multiple Developer Solution Design

From Dwayne Wright - www.dwaynewright.com

This topic jumped to my mind because of a situation I’m in at the office. We have a tight deadline on a large FileMaker project and we needed to pool our development resources in order to finish it properly. At first, it was just two developers working on different areas of the same database. Then another developer needed to jump in to wire up the integration between that database and the accounting software package called QuickBooks. Then one of the original developers needed to step out and I stepped in. So just in case you are confused, the current count is three developers working on the same solution at the same time.

In this case, the multiple developers working on the same project at the same time came out of necessity. However, it was something we had been talking about for quite some time. There have been posts to some of the FileMaker forums and openly discussed in various FileMaker developer meetings like FMPug meetings and the annual FileMaker Developers Conference. For the most part, these discussions were centered around “Why Can’t We” or “Why Doesn’t FileMaker Allow Us To” discussions. This is because FileMaker (the application) wasn’t designed to be developed like this. However, with each new released version of FileMaker, it gets a little better in the area of multiple developer design.

I should say that concurrent FileMaker developer design does require a copy of FileMaker server. I would never recommend it under any other set of conditions. This way, if one of the users machines crashes, the database files are 99% just fine. In my office, all FileMaker design work is done with the files on a FileMaker Server.

I would also never recommend this design method for junior FileMaker developers. However, a team of professional FileMaker developers can make a lot of development headway in a short amount of time.

There are some limitations in concurrent FileMaker design. Only one user can save changes done in the Define (tables/fields/relationship) dialog box at a time. This is true for ScriptMaker as well, up to FileMaker 9. I do believe that this new feature of FileMaker 9 probably requires that the server and all the developers to be using FileMaker 9 as well. Normal practice in this situation is to have everyone using the same version of FileMaker across the board.

One way to overcome the above limitations is to have a FileMaker solution using more than one file and have a developer working (primarily) on a file of their own but still contributing to the design of the overall FileMaker solution.

Another little odd tidbit is that one developer can write a custom function while another developer is defining a calculation. Although this isn’t a magic bullet for the concurrent developer limitations, it does allow for some interesting opportunities.
=
More info about the author and FileMaker in general, contact me at info@dwaynewright.com.

© 2007 - Dwayne Wright - dwaynewright.com

The material on this document is offered AS IS. There is NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY, expressed or implied, nor does any other contributor to this document. WARRANTIES OF MERCHANT ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMED. Consequential and incidental damages are expressly excluded. FileMaker Pro is the registered trademark of FileMaker Inc.

Thursday
Jul262007

MIGRATION: The Hand You Are Dealt

From Dwayne Wright - www.dwaynewright.com

Many times when a developer is looking at migrating an older FileMaker database to a new version of FileMaker, they have to sit back and look at the hand they were dealt. Many times, you can categorize the database you are converting into categories such as ....

- minor upgrade from one version to the next, with some of the new features of the latest version of FileMaker rolled in.

- a post FileMaker 7 database solution that needs some detailed work to be able to embrace the features of the latest version of FileMaker

- a good FileMaker 6 (or earlier) FileMaker solution that needs updating to the latest version of FileMaker. For the short term, a major rewrite is not necessary but thoughts about a rewrite of the solution should be documented.

- then we have the various levels of “Oh, my good gracious” in which a FileMaker solution is performing it’s tasks but it’s a literal mess under the hood.

In all but the last case, you may decide it’s best to convert those databases to the latest version of FileMaker directly and test them for a period of time before rolling them out. In the last case, you may want to consider creating a whole new database from scratch and bringing over on the things that are working.

If you haven’t done a full migration in the past, you might want to consult a professional FileMaker developer. You may want them to do the entire conversion for you, run an analysis of potential problems, ask them to review the solution / make recommendations or any combination thereof. Those of us with a decade or more of FileMaker experience can be very helpful in large conversions and the money in consulting fees can help ensure your migration is a success.
=
More info about the author and FileMaker in general, contact me at info@dwaynewright.com.

© 2007 - Dwayne Wright - dwaynewright.com

The material on this document is offered AS IS. There is NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY, expressed or implied, nor does any other contributor to this document. WARRANTIES OF MERCHANT ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMED. Consequential and incidental damages are expressly excluded. FileMaker Pro is the registered trademark of FileMaker Inc.

Page 1 ... 213 214 215 216 217